Latest Episodes

Silver Screen Queens 185: Arrival

30 November 2016 • 39 minutes, 47 seconds

This Amy Adams/Jeremy Renner sci-fi has been getting great word of mouth, so we check it out. If you haven’t seen it yet, we recommend you do so before listening to this episode, because it really is best enjoyed unspoiled.

Mobile Couch 97: Javascript Dishwashers

28 November 2016 • 58 minutes, 1 second

Ben takes Jelly on a journey through his favourite points from the book Pragmatic Programming: From Journeyman to Master, which details points that you’ll want to learn if you want to be a better developer. Along the way they discuss everything from philosophy to buying dishwashers, and maybe even a little actual code here and there.

Silver Screen Queens 184: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

23 November 2016 • 57 minutes, 53 seconds

We weren’t really that excited to hear about another Harry Potter franchise. As long-term fans, we have been burnt before by the films, and this movie didn’t exactly generate a buzz. Luckily, this set us up to be pleasantly surprised by a charming Eddie Redmayne, a creepy Colin Farrell, and a ragtag band of mostly-unknowns giving it their all.

Silver Screen Queens 183: Westworld (1973)

16 November 2016 • 36 minutes, 24 seconds

With the new Westworld TV show blowing up, we decided to go back to the original film, written and directed by Michael Crichton in 1973. We were pleasantly surprised by a smart sci-fi that was way ahead of its time. It was the first film to use CGI technology, four years before STAR WARS, and it has a sensitive and thoughtful take on the rise of robots and artificial intelligence. Sure, it’s slow by today’s standards, but we’re glad we made the effort. You can rent it on YouTube for a few bucks.

Mobile Couch 96: Why Are Manhole Covers Round?

14 November 2016 • 49 minutes, 38 seconds

Jelly recounts his experience with interviewing for a developer position within a big tech company. He and Ben reveal a little insight into what the process is like, what you should know going in, and what you can take from the process to apply to the interviews at your own company.

Silver Screen Queens 182: Hell or High Water

9 November 2016 • 32 minutes, 28 seconds

We didn’t know much about this film, other than Chris Pine Western, so obviously we had to see it. While it’s got some good points (gorgeous cinematography, interesting score, adventurous direction and good acting), the film as a whole felt a bit too languid for a movie about two bank robbers being pursued by a Texas Ranger.

Silver Screen Queens 181: Doctor Strange

2 November 2016 • 43 minutes, 9 seconds

We didn’t exactly go into Marvel’s latest effort with high expectations, but we were pleasantly surprised. Once you get past the whitewashing, the male-centric story and the bad accent, it’s well-made escapist fun with good actors and sterling special effects. Marvel sucks us in once again.

Mobile Couch 95: Quickly Close It Again

31 October 2016 • 1 hour, 1 minute

Ben and Jelly run through a quick and dirty primary of Git, one of the most popular version control systems around today. Starting from the very basics, they run through all the things you need to know to use it in your day to day work, why you should be using some method of version control, and the clients they use to make things nice and easy to manage.

Silver Screen Queens 180: The Girl on the Train

26 October 2016 • 45 minutes, 18 seconds

Another blockbuster novel turned film, The Girl on the Train has quite a bit in common with 2014’s Gone Girl, although executed with less finesse. It has some strong points, namely the prioritising of womens’ viewpoints, a serious discussion of domestic abuse, and a great lead performance from Emily Blunt, but the structure is messy and there are plot holes big enough to drive a train through.

Silver Screen Queens 179: Deepwater Horizon

19 October 2016 • 44 minutes, 30 seconds

SSQ favourites Dylan O’Brien and Gina Rodriguez star in this dramatisation of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster that led to the worst oil spill in US history, creating devastation in the Gulf of Mexico. We went in not expecting much, coming from the director of BATTLESHIP, but we were mistaken. The movie approaches its subject matter with compassion and humanity and largely avoids some of the more dire disaster movie clichés.